The General Patton Route

Developed and realized by the “La Mémoire Civile 1940 – 1945” group with support of local communities and schools, as well as the “Ardennes Breakthrough Association”,  in the 2019 – 2022 period, the General Patton Route mainly retraces the route of the US 4th Armored Division its advance to counter the German offensive in the Ardennes; commonly known as the Battle of the Bulge.

At several locations, markers were erected to explain what happened along the route.

The project also involved remodeling sites in Fauvillers, Chaumont and Assenois.

The following is a short guide to these locations.

FAUVILLERS 

(GPS 49.851509, 5.663083)

Fauvillers

Fauvillers and surroundings were the assembly area of the majority of the 4th Armored Division in preparation for its advance, followed by several other US units in the days following.

Continue to Hotte.

HOTTE 

(GPS 49.871437, 5.662703)

Hotte

Hotte view point is the only view point where one can see the advance of the three Combat Commands (CCA, B & C) of the 4th Armored Division in the area.

CCA in the East, CCB on the road where the marker is and CCR in the West.

Continue to Menufontaine.

BURNON BRIDGE

(GPS 49.886505, 5.658763)

Burnon bridge

Combat Command B was temporarily halted here by the blown bridge on December 22, 1944. Under enemy fire, a bridgehead was established here and a crossing site for heavy vehicles was constructed. The US force could resume its advance north.

Continue to Lambaichenet Woods.

LAMBAICHENET WOODS

(GPS 49.901617, 5.667908)

Sklar

This “in between” stop takes one to the area where Captain Fred SKLAR went missing in action. The officer and two men went into these woods to check enemy resistance on December 24, 1944. The officer was wounded and taken prisoner and presumably died of his wounds the next day at a temporary German aid station in Niederwampach, Luxembourg. It is highly likely that he is buried as an unknown soldier at the Luxembourg American Military Cemetery.

Continue to Chaumont.

CHAUMONT BEECH TREE

(GPS 49.917144, 5.667210)

Chaumont Tree

Originally developed by Mr. Ivan STEENKISTE, this site has been remodeled and incorporated in the “General Patton Route”.

The (still original) Beech tree bore witness to a tragedy when on December 23, 1944, a jeep and a light tank were hit by German anti-tank fire killing and wounding several soldiers.

It was here that Combat Command B launched its first assault on Chaumont that same day.

Continue to the Materne Farm.

WIEDORFER MONUMENT

(GPS 49.918900, 5.672602)

Wiedorfer

Behind the ridge, Private Paul WIEDORFER (318th Regiment, 80th Infantry Division) solely took out two German machinegun nests and captured German infantrymen, allowing his company to continue its assault on Chaumont on December 25, 1944.

For this action he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Continue to the center of Chaumont.

GENERAL IRZYK PARK

(GPS 49.919221, 5.671044)

Irzyk

Another of Mr. Ivan STEENKISTE’s projects. General (then Major) Albin F. IRZYK’s 8th Tank Battalion with supported infantry launched two bitter attacks at the Germans in and around Chaumont on December 23 and 25, 1944.

This memorial park was created in his and his men’s memory.

Continue to further up the road.

COLONEL COHEN STREET

  • (GPS 49.920132, 5.671891)
  • (GPS 49.922515, 5.672299)
Cohen

This street (also a project of Mr. Ivan STEENKISTE) was named after the commander of the 10th Armored Infantry Battalion; Colonel Harold COHEN. With armor support of General IRZYK’s 8th Tank Battalion, his men assaulted Chaumont on December 23 and 25, 1944.

Continue to Clochimont.

CLOCHIMONT CROSSROADS

(GPS 49.947348, 5.663963)

Clochimont

These crossroads played an important role in the advance to Bastogne and the subsequently evacuation of civilians and wounded from the city.

It was also the point where Combat Commands B (coming from Grandru) and R (coming from Remichampagne) joined.

Later on, many other units passed through these crossroads.

Continue to Assenois.

HENDRIX MONUMENT ASSENOIS

(GPS 49.966908, 5.681452)

Hendrix

Here in Assenois, Private James HENDRIX (53rd Armored Infantry Battalion) won the Medal of Honor for taking out several German gun positions and rescuing wounded men from a burning vehicle while under enemy fire.

Continue to the Bastogne industrial terrain.

BREAKTHROUGH BUNKER ASSENOIS

(GPS 49.984366, 5.700003)

Assenois bunker

On December 26, 1944, at approximately 1650 hours, the US 4th Armored Division made contact with elements of the 101st Airborne Division. Doing so, it broke the German encirclement of Bastogne.

But the fighting was far from over. Still more brutal fighting in severe winter weather awaited …

Continue to Bastogne.

PATTON MONUMENT BASTOGNE

(GPS 49.998148, 5.715486)

Bastogne Patton

Memorial dedicated to General George S. Patton whose United States Third Army countered the German offensive from the south, after turning his army 90  degrees to the North from the Saar area in France.

 

 

Continue to the McAuliffe Square.

McAULIFFE SQUARE BASTOGNE

(GPS 50.000722, 5.715266)

Bastogne McAuliffe

Place du Carré, now Place McAuliffe, the now buzzing center of activities.

The Sherman tank of the 11th Armored Division (retrieved from the Renuâmont area) standing guard next to the bust of General Anthony McAuliffe (temporary commander of the 101st Airborne Division during the siege). 

 

End of route.

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